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Rocky Mountain Elk: A Local History Exhibit Opens At The Museum October 2

Elk Herd Transport – This Stanley Mountain Wagon was rigged with a cage to transport the elk from Lyons to Estes Park.

Elk Herd Transport – This Stanley Mountain Wagon was rigged with a cage to transport the elk from Lyons to Estes Park.

The Estes Park Museum, located at 200 Fourth Street, will open Rocky Mountain Elk: A Local History, a new temporary exhibit, on October 2 at 5:00 p.m. The exhibit will explore how elk came to live in the Estes valley and it will reflect on their tremendous impact here. The public is invited to join Museum staff and Friends for a free opening reception from 5:00 – 7:00 p.m. on October 2. The wine and hors d’oeuvres reception is sponsored by the Town of Estes Park and the Estes Park Museum Friends & Foundation, Inc.  Door prizes for visitors will be drawn at 6:30 p.m. Rocky Mountain Elk: A Local History will be on display through April 25, 2010 in the main gallery of the Museum.

The elk population that inhabits the Rocky Mountains descends from a Eurasian species that most likely migrated across the Bering Strait twelve million years ago. Those elk claimed this portion of the Southern Rockies as their home for the past twelve thousand years and their descendents have become an integral part of the ecosystem. When the original population in this area was decimated due to hunting in the late 1800s, two groups consisting of 29 and 24 elk each were transplanted from the Jackson Hole region of Wyoming in 1913 and again in 1915. The elk we see in Estes Park today originate from those groups. Due to their size, mating rituals, and prominence in Estes Park, elk are a draw for millions of tourists annually.

Make a stop at the Museum during Elktober and discover the unique role the elk have contributed to the Estes valley’s history, from their interactions with Native Americans and settlers, to current issues such as overpopulation and chronic wasting disease.  Objects on display include historic photographs of the elk transplant project, artwork, and collectible souvenirs from the Elkhorn Lodge.  Interactive stations throughout the exhibit encourage learning about the animal. Rocky Mountain Elk: A Local History will be on display through April 25, 2010.

The Museum is located at 200 Fourth Street and is open Monday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and Sunday from 1:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m. now through October 31. From November through April, the Museum is open Friday and Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and Sunday from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. The mission of the Estes Park Museum is to collect, interpret and preserve local history, as well as to present exhibits, programs and events for the education and benefit of residents and visitors of all ages. For more information call the Estes Park Museum at 586-6256 or visit the Museum’s website at www.estes.org/museum.  Admission is always free.

The Estes Park Museum, located at 200 Fourth Street, will open Rocky Mountain Elk: A Local History, a new temporary exhibit, on October 2 at 5:00 p.m. The exhibit will explore how elk came to live in the Estes valley and it will reflect on their tremendous impact here. The public is invited to join Museum staff and Friends for a free opening reception from 5:00 – 7:00 p.m. on October 2. The wine and hors d’oeuvres reception is sponsored by the Town of Estes Park and the Estes Park Museum Friends & Foundation, Inc.  Door prizes for visitors will be drawn at 6:30 p.m. Rocky Mountain Elk: A Local History will be on display through April 25, 2010 in the main gallery of the Museum.
The elk population that inhabits the Rocky Mountains descends from a Eurasian species that most likely migrated across the Bering Strait twelve million years ago. Those elk claimed this portion of the Southern Rockies as their home for the past twelve thousand years and their descendents have become an integral part of the ecosystem. When the original population in this area was decimated due to hunting in the late 1800s, two groups consisting of 29 and 24 elk each were transplanted from the Jackson Hole region of Wyoming in 1913 and again in 1915. The elk we see in Estes Park today originate from those groups. Due to their size, mating rituals, and prominence in Estes Park, elk are a draw for millions of tourists annually.
Make a stop at the Museum during Elktober and discover the unique role the elk have contributed to the Estes valley’s history, from their interactions with Native Americans and settlers, to current issues such as overpopulation and chronic wasting disease.  Objects on display include historic photographs of the elk transplant project, artwork, and collectible souvenirs from the Elkhorn Lodge.  Interactive stations throughout the exhibit encourage learning about the animal. Rocky Mountain Elk: A Local History will be on display through April 25, 2010.
The Museum is located at 200 Fourth Street and is open Monday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and Sunday from 1:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m. now through October 31. From November through April, the Museum is open Friday and Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and Sunday from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. The mission of the Estes Park Museum is to collect, interpret and preserve local history, as well as to present exhibits, programs and events for the education and benefit of residents and visitors of all ages. For more information call the Estes Park Museum at 586-6256 or visit the Museum’s website at www.estes.org/museum.  Admission is always free.

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