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Granny May Arena Gets A “Fresh” Lease On Life

Although titled a demolition project, the removal of the Granny May Arena was more of a deconstruction and reuse effort. Through the combined efforts of Thorpe Associates Architects, EPURA, the Town of Estes Park, and general contactor Cornerstone Construction Concepts, Inc. 98% of the gross weight of the grandstand building was either reused or recycled, making the project arguably the greenest demolition in Estes Park history.
The process began when Thorpe and Associates issued the request for proposal for the demolition that included option for re-use of the bleachers and the building. While at the pre construction meeting, Ben Greer, project manager from Cornerstone Construction Concepts, Inc. noticed the similarity between the steel structure and a dairy barn project he had looked at in Bellvue, outside of Fort Collins, Colorado. The farmer, Rob Graves; agreed to pay for the disassembly and shipping of the steel structure to the dairy if Cornerstone was awarded the contract. Cornerstone made a similar agreement with The Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo Association for the bleachers.
Reused materials are even greener than recycled materials because no energy is used to reprocess. The reused bleachers and building structure totaled 100 tons of material, or 21% of the total materials. Total recycled materials amounted to 370 tons, or 77% of the total materials. The concrete was hauled by Kearney and Sons Excavation to be crushed and recycled into local road base. The miscellaneous steel including conduits, gas pipe, pipe rail, etc., was also extracted from the building and recycled. The materials that could nor be reused or recycled weighed 10 tons, or only 2% of the total.
The Grandstand structure has also taken on a unique historical perspective. The Morning Fresh Dairy was started in 1894 by current owner Rob Graves’ grandfather. The old one room schoolhouse located on the dairy farm is recorded in the National Registry of Historic Places. The circa 1950s Grandstand structure is an excellent addition to an already historic property.

Photo courtesy Ben Greer

Although titled a demolition project, the removal of the Granny May Arena was more of a deconstruction and reuse effort. Through the combined efforts of Thorpe Associates Architects, EPURA, the Town of Estes Park, and general contactor Cornerstone Construction Concepts, Inc. 98% of the gross weight of the grandstand building was either reused or recycled, making the project arguably the greenest demolition in Estes Park history.

The process began when Thorpe and Associates issued the request for proposal for the demolition that included option for re-use of the bleachers and the building. While at the pre construction meeting, Ben Greer, project manager from Cornerstone Construction Concepts, Inc. noticed the similarity between the steel structure and a dairy barn project he had looked at in Bellvue, outside of Fort Collins, Colorado. The farmer, Rob Graves; agreed to pay for the disassembly and shipping of the steel structure to the dairy if Cornerstone was awarded the contract. Cornerstone made a similar agreement with The Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo Association for the bleachers.

Reused materials are even greener than recycled materials because no energy is used to reprocess. The reused bleachers and building structure totaled 100 tons of material, or 21% of the total materials. Total recycled materials amounted to 370 tons, or 77% of the total materials. The concrete was hauled by Kearney and Sons Excavation to be crushed and recycled into local road base. The miscellaneous steel including conduits, gas pipe, pipe rail, etc., was also extracted from the building and recycled. The materials that could nor be reused or recycled weighed 10 tons, or only 2% of the total.

The Grandstand structure has also taken on a unique historical perspective. The Morning Fresh Dairy was started in 1894 by current owner Rob Graves’ grandfather. The old one room schoolhouse located on the dairy farm is recorded in the National Registry of Historic Places. The circa 1950s Grandstand structure is an excellent addition to an already historic property.

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