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Care Of Photographs At The Estes Park Museum: An American Heritage Preservation Project

 Emporia State University students form an “assembly line,” working together in creating new folders to re-house objects before they were returned to the flat file storage cabinet. Photo courtesy Estes Park Museum

Emporia State University students form an “assembly line,” working together in creating new folders to re-house objects before they were returned to the flat file storage cabinet. Photo courtesy Estes Park Museum

Join Estes Park Museum Manager/Curator of Exhibits, Derek Fortini, at 200 Fourth Street when he presents a program entitled Care of Photographs at the Estes Park Museum: An American Heritage Preservation Project on November 14 at 2:00 p.m. With over 24,000 objects in the collection, curators are confronted with many tasks to manage and care for the preservation of objects. In 2008, the Estes Park Museum recognized that in order to better protect and better serve the public, they needed to re-organize one particular flat file storage cabinet that contained significant oversized photographs, maps, and documents, and numerous pieces of artworks. Both scholars and the general public come to the Museum seeking answers to their questions regarding Estes Park History. Objects in that cabinet ranged in age of creation from 1885 to 1990, however these objects were difficult to access because of inadequate facility space and organization. The primary concern for curators was overcrowding. Every time an item was retrieved, the integrity of the surrounding objects would be potentially sacrificed.

In an effort to reduce the risk of harming these invaluable pieces, the Museum submitted a grant to the Institute of Museum and Library Services’ (IMLS) American Heritage Preservation seeking monetary support to acquire another flat file storage cabinet and purchase archival materials to re-house those objects. Upon being awarded the grant, the Curator of Collections recruited the help of seven graduate students from the School of Library & Information Management, Emporia State University to help with the re-housing project.

Over the course of one week, 413 objects were re-housed based on their shape and were stored in shelves with enough room for protection and collections expansion. In order to do so, all items were re-inventoried and corresponding files were updated in the Estes Park Museum database. As a result of all the hard work, the Museum will now be better able to access any of the stored objects for promotion and use during programs, exhibit design, or for research requests from the public. In this program, Fortini will discuss how the project was executed with an inside look at current conservation methods and a discussion about how to protect our precious pieces from the past.

The Estes Park Museum located at 200 Fourth Street, will be open to the public on Fridays and Saturdays from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Sundays. The rest of the week staff will be in the office and will attend to research requests by appointment only. To schedule an appointment or to find out more about the Museum collection and programs contact Alicia Mittelman at 970-577-3762 or by email at amittelman@estes.org. The winter hours will run now through May 1, 2010.

The Historic Fall River Hydroplant remains closed for the season except for private tours.Tours may be scheduled for groups of 10 people or more by calling the number listed above. The mission of the Estes Park Museum is to collect, interpret and preserve local history, as well as to present exhibits, programs and events for the education and benefit of residents and visitors of all ages. For more information call the Estes Park Museum at 586-6256 or visit the Museum’s website at www.estes.org/museum. Admission is always free.

Join Estes Park Museum Manager/Curator of Exhibits, Derek Fortini, at 200 Fourth Street when he presents a program entitled Care of Photographs at the Estes Park Museum: An American Heritage Preservation Project on November 14 at 2:00 p.m. With over 24,000 objects in the collection, curators are confronted with many tasks to manage and care for the preservation of objects. In 2008, the Estes Park Museum recognized that in order to better protect and better serve the public, they needed to re-organize one particular flat file storage cabinet that contained significant oversized photographs, maps, and documents, and numerous pieces of artworks. Both scholars and the general public come to the Museum seeking answers to their questions regarding Estes Park History. Objects in that cabinet ranged in age of creation from 1885 to 1990, however these objects were difficult to access because of inadequate facility space and organization. The primary concern for curators was overcrowding. Every time an item was retrieved, the integrity of the surrounding objects would be potentially sacrificed.
In an effort to reduce the risk of harming these invaluable pieces, the Museum submitted a grant to the Institute of Museum and Library Services’ (IMLS) American Heritage Preservation seeking monetary support to acquire another flat file storage cabinet and purchase archival materials to re-house those objects. Upon being awarded the grant, the Curator of Collections recruited the help of seven graduate students from the School of Library & Information Management, Emporia State University to help with the re-housing project.
Over the course of one week, 413 objects were re-housed based on their shape and were stored in shelves with enough room for protection and collections expansion. In order to do so, all items were re-inventoried and corresponding files were updated in the Estes Park Museum database. As a result of all the hard work, the Museum will now be better able to access any of the stored objects for promotion and use during programs, exhibit design, or for research requests from the public. In this program, Fortini will discuss how the project was executed with an inside look at current conservation methods and a discussion about how to protect our precious pieces from the past.
The Estes Park Museum located at 200 Fourth Street, will be open to the public on Fridays and Saturdays from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Sundays. The rest of the week staff will be in the office and will attend to research requests by appointment only. To schedule an appointment or to find out more about the Museum collection and programs contact Alicia Mittelman at 970-577-3762 or by email at amittelman@estes.org. The winter hours will run now through May 1, 2010.
The Historic Fall River Hydroplant remains closed for the season except for private tours.Tours may be scheduled for groups of 10 people or more by calling the number listed above. The mission of the Estes Park Museum is to collect, interpret and preserve local history, as well as to present exhibits, programs and events for the education and benefit of residents and visitors of all ages. For more information call the Estes Park Museum at 586-6256 or visit the Museum’s website at www.estes.org/museum. Admission is always free.

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